1. 19:32 21st Oct 2014

    Notes: 3396

    Reblogged from eisuverse

    anthonyholden:

    Dear Citizens of Internetville,

    The Doodle Quest Kickstarter is now live! If you have enjoyed looking at my drawings as much as I have loved making them, perhaps you would like them on your shelf at home.

    I’d love to have your help in making this book. Please consider reblogging to spread the word, and take luck on your journey!

     
  2. 19:32

    Notes: 165360

    Reblogged from toodrunktofindanurl

    ereri-is-l0ve-ereri-is-life:

    thehomosexuallyfrustrated:

    vivavoxveritas:

    The Fosters, finally a show that confirms boys have crushes even when they’re 12.  Let me rephrase:  especially when they’re 12.

    Just adorable

    The Fosters legit has every kind of representation you could ask for. I mean whether Callie is asexual or just having ptsd is debatable but yeah there’s a biracial lesbian couple raising a family, a 12 year old boy having a crush on another boy, an extremely important trans character with a good plot line (he’s actually treated like a real character!) and yeah the show is the best

    (Source: callieandjude)

     
  3. 19:31

    Notes: 160

    Reblogged from toodrunktofindanurl

    sarthefirst:

    The accepted slightly weird things at Silas University (and the one thing that isn’t) [x]

    Bonus Gif:

    image

     
  4. 19:27

    Notes: 106890

    Reblogged from cksaul

    Dont miss out on something that could be great just because it could also be difficult.
    — Unknown (via suchvodka)

    (Source: for-dayys)

     
  5. 19:27

    Notes: 108239

    Reblogged from dizzychild121

    ziqqawest:

    missingkitsune:

    toki-yo-tomare:

    barbeauxbot:

    unsuccessfulmetalbenders:

    was this movie even real

    this movie is called Kung Fu Hustle and you owe it to yourself to watch it

    BEST MOVIE EVER

    ^^^^ Yas I was about to say that & it’s funny af bruh

    (Source: bunchesopunches)

     
  6. 19:26

    Notes: 459346

    Reblogged from dizzychild121

    image: Download

    stfueverything:

ramsexalicious:

mrscriss2012:

This is my son, Chester, who is nearly 4. He was invited to his friend Chloe’s birthday party today, the theme was prince and princesses. He asked if he could go as Sleeping Beauty, so I bought him a dress and put a cute little clip in his hair.
We arrived at the party to the following comments from the adults present: “Oh that is just cruel.”
"Why did you make him wear a dress?"
"Poor little man, what’s your mummy playing at?"
"He’s going to hate you when he grows up."
"No way I’d let my son dress like a girl."
The fact is, Chester is almost completely gender neutral. I let him wear what he wants, be it boys or girls clothes, and he plays with whatever toys he likes. This usually involves him holding tea parties while wearing his pink Minnie Mouse top, jeans and a tiara. The guests are more often than not a mixture of Winnie The Pooh characters, dinosaurs, Barbie, Dora and solders, and they’re usually transported in his favorite fire engine.
When my husband arrived at the party later on, he was subjected to endless ridicule from the other dad’s present about how I must keep his balls in my back pocket because otherwise he would have put his foot down and not allowed Chester out like that. Oh, and by the way, our other son dressed as Ariel. When my husband pointed out that the boys were happy, and the mother of the birthday child made a point of saying how wonderful she thought it was that we allowed them freedom of choice and expression, they then stopped talking about it to our faces and started muttering about us behind our backs.
Interestingly enough, not a single child said a word about their choice of costumes, other than to compliment Chester on his new dress.

not a single child made a negative comment
not a single child made a negative comment
not a single child made a negative comment

this is important

    stfueverything:

    ramsexalicious:

    mrscriss2012:

    This is my son, Chester, who is nearly 4. He was invited to his friend Chloe’s birthday party today, the theme was prince and princesses. He asked if he could go as Sleeping Beauty, so I bought him a dress and put a cute little clip in his hair.

    We arrived at the party to the following comments from the adults present:
    “Oh that is just cruel.”

    "Why did you make him wear a dress?"

    "Poor little man, what’s your mummy playing at?"

    "He’s going to hate you when he grows up."

    "No way I’d let my son dress like a girl."

    The fact is, Chester is almost completely gender neutral. I let him wear what he wants, be it boys or girls clothes, and he plays with whatever toys he likes. This usually involves him holding tea parties while wearing his pink Minnie Mouse top, jeans and a tiara. The guests are more often than not a mixture of Winnie The Pooh characters, dinosaurs, Barbie, Dora and solders, and they’re usually transported in his favorite fire engine.

    When my husband arrived at the party later on, he was subjected to endless ridicule from the other dad’s present about how I must keep his balls in my back pocket because otherwise he would have put his foot down and not allowed Chester out like that. Oh, and by the way, our other son dressed as Ariel. When my husband pointed out that the boys were happy, and the mother of the birthday child made a point of saying how wonderful she thought it was that we allowed them freedom of choice and expression, they then stopped talking about it to our faces and started muttering about us behind our backs.

    Interestingly enough, not a single child said a word about their choice of costumes, other than to compliment Chester on his new dress.

    not a single child made a negative comment

    not a single child made a negative comment

    not a single child made a negative comment

    this is important

     
  7. 19:24

    Notes: 188092

    Reblogged from dizzychild121

    image: Download

    (Source: pk---love)

     
  8. 21:34 20th Oct 2014

    Notes: 665

    Reblogged from uhur4

    bear1na:

    In a Backyard Far Far Away Series by Craig Davison

    Star Wars - Princess Leia, Chewbecca, Han Solo, Luke Skywalker, Yoda, Darth Vader, Boba Fett, R2-D2, X-Wing, and TIE Fighter

     
  9. 21:29

    Notes: 31

    Reblogged from wantering-menswear

    image: Download

    luxe-menswear:

DSQUARED2 Jacket
     
  10. 21:27

    Notes: 65798

    Reblogged from pasdechat

    pyrrhiccomedy:

    moniquill:

    accioharo:

    blackandyellowdoodles:

    justacynicalirishman:

    babyshibe:

    doctorgaylove:

    thecoppercow:

    That Mysterious “S” Thing We Used to Draw (by the1janitor)

    We used to draw this as kids and it’s always confused me. It still really bothers me tbh.

    This is really creepy tbh.

    yeah we used to draw these! around 2002. at the time i was told it was like the slipknot logo but now i know it’s totally not. but we did used to get in trouble for drawing them.

    we never got in trouble with them. I had them all over my school planner lol. 

    (We did call them ‘super S’) 

    There’s this awesome book I read called ‘The People in the Playground’ which concerns the observations of an anthropologist on children’s folklore: the stuff that kids independently teach one another in school yards and playgrounds that has no real connection to adult lore and media. This is a great example of it, as are hand clapping and jump rope verses.


    If you can finish the lines “Miss Mary Mack Mack Mack all dressed in black black black…” or ‘Hinky Pinky Ponky, Daddy had a donkey…”or “Miss Suzy had a steamboat…” or “Engine Engine number nine…”

    stop and think about where you learned them.


    It probably wasn’t from an adult or out of a book or in any formal way. It was from another kid; someone a grade ahead of you or someone’s older sibling or something. Who learned it the same way.

    This is CHILD lore. Sometimes a fad will come and go in a single age cohort, sometimes it’ll last for generations. It’s kind of awesome.

    The idea of child lore and a distinct child culture is really interesting, especially when you consider that children have a few traditions that go back hundreds of years.

    For example: did you ever play “Quaker’s meeting?” Quaker’s meeting has begun, no more laughter, no more fun…that dates back two centuries

    And of course there’s “Ring around the rosie,” which goes all the way back to the time of the black plague.

    Children pass these things down among themselves as part of a legacy they lack the context to fully understand; but you could say the same thing about most adult traditions. That unbroken chain of shared knowledge connects their play to the play of children from hundreds of years ago, without any adult input or encouragement.

    That’s cool.